Teachers as resisting intellectuals

This post inspires me. You have argued well, focussing on the need for all of us to be more discerning and not to follow blindly. Ideology today is sadly bound up with making money, and this is where we must be most vigilant. Thank-you. Daisy

EduFlections

The outrage this week that has been expressed by some educators on Twitter against David Didau’s What causes behaviour? has prompted many to inspect their own thinking on race and intelligence. I am not a geneticist so I am not in the position to offer an expert view on the research in this field. More learned scholars such as Steve Watson and Benjamin Doxtdator have offered their views in their respective blog posts. Nick Dennis’s critique further points out the “lazy” research that forms the shaky ground of David’s position which has been construed as advocacy for “racial differences in IQ”, a remark he made in response to a comment to his piece through Feedback. His obstinacy to recognise pitfalls in his work when challenged adds more frustration to his critics.

The event took a more disturbing turn when Tomas White pointed out that the research that David cites to…

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Should I Expose the Perpetrator of a Hate Crime directed at me. Are there ‘No Excuses?’

Back in May I decided to take some time out of Twitter and being rather 'green' to the whole business, I suspended my account. I thought it was the best way to do it. How wrong could I be? Unbeknownst to me within minutes of me suspending my Twitter account, someone who had been stalking …

Continue reading Should I Expose the Perpetrator of a Hate Crime directed at me. Are there ‘No Excuses?’

Why mistakes must be celebrated

Roger Titcombe's Learning Matters

I have just read a book by Matthew Syed entitled ‘Black Box Thinking‘ (2015), John Murray.

Despite the title, it is about, learning from mistakes. The ‘black box’ reference is literal. It refers to the black box data in crashed aircraft that provide the evidence needed to learn from mistakes that caused or contributed to the crash. It addresses a vast range of bad event contexts from airline safety through deaths and harm caused by medical errors, the mental contortions of politicians faced with dire negative consequences of their decisions ( eg invading Iraq), the unwillingness of police and prosecutors to accept the innocence of those wrongly convicted of serious crimes when subsequently vindicated by solid evidence (often DNA), to wrong-headed decision making in business, scientific research, sport and more.

It is a powerful articulation of the vital, perhaps universal, role of mistakes in all deep learning.

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Consciously Cruel ‘no-excuses’ policies…in the Job Centre and at School.

Most children have a REASON…..not an excuse.

Daisy Norfolk Notes...

i-daniel-blake-2016-005-daniel-with-his-wall-graffiti

Those of you who have got to know me on twitter over the last few months may have been aware that there was a charity screening in Norwich recently of the film I, Daniel Blake. I’ll be honest with you, I had not actually seen the film before seeing it at this screening, and although I had meticulously read the screenplay, it in no way prepared me for the on-screen ‘kick-in-the-guts’ this film delivered.

Whilst hunkering down in the plush seats at Cinema City, with the 106 other folks who had purchased tickets, I began to think about the underlying themes of the film. Those of friendship, compassion and resilience in the face of adversity. Daniel Blake exhibited all of these traits in spades, yet he was defeated by a system which did not value any of them. Daniel struggles against a benefits system designed to make it difficult to…

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‘NOT ON OUR WATCH!’- A COLLECTIVE STAND AGAINST CREEPING VILLAINY.

Ed Blog Reader - A digest of interesting writing on educational issues

farhaanpatel

Originally posted on EducatingHeartsBlog:

This week, a teacher, accompanying children on a school trip to the US, was asked to leave the plane in Reykjavik.

What does that make you feel? What questions does it raise?

He wasn’t given an explanation regarding why he was taken off the plane, but rather just given some hotel vouchers in order spend 24 hours in a country he hadn’t intended on spending any time in.

What does that make you feel? What questions does it raise?

This teacher was Muslim.

What does that make you feel? What questions does it raise?

Throughout my first week back after half term, I have spent many a moment thinking about my colleague, Juhel- the young, Welsh maths teacher who was sadly removed from a plane and not allowed to travel to the US with his pupils . Empathy has been often discussed on Twitter (and other…

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Consciously Cruel ‘no-excuses’ policies…in the Job Centre and at School.

Those of you who have got to know me on twitter over the last few months may have been aware that there was a charity screening in Norwich recently of the film I, Daniel Blake. I'll be honest with you, I had not actually seen the film before seeing it at this screening, and although …

Continue reading Consciously Cruel ‘no-excuses’ policies…in the Job Centre and at School.

Responding in kind

Primary Musings

The thing about educators is that they love helping people learn and this often includes the desire to teach other teachers. Sometimes this comes in a nice, helpful guise, like “Hey, this is working really well for me, you could try it if you like.” Sometimes it comes in a less helpful guise, such as, “If you don’t do it my way, you obviously hate children and are actively trying to destroy their future.” And sometimes, this responsibility for helping others to learn positions us to react to things on their behalf. So we sit in a CPD session on behaviour management and think, “I hope Miss Smith is listening to this because her class are terrible.” Or we listen to a talk on values and think, “Thank goodness they’re emphasising teamwork because last week Mr Jones was mean.” Or we read a blog post on kindness and make a list of…

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The Emperor’s New Pedagogy

Vince Ulam

frink-1

The False Dichotomy

There is a modish crowd abroad who believe that psychology is the cloth of gold from which pedagogy is to be spun and tailored. While it is true that psychology informs good pedagogy, wanton appeal to it as a cover for self-promotion, private consultancy and pedagogical reform should not go unchallenged.

To give an opening example, decades worth of very significant research by leading psychologists into the role of memory in learning processes has been used to persuade hundreds of people teaching thousands of pupils across the country that a flashcard scaled to A4, laminated and called a “knowledge organiser” is the ultimate product of cutting edge cognitive science and every pupil’s passport to Oxbridge. Persuaded of this, you are a “traditionalist“, a champion of knowledge and all-round good sort. Sceptical and you are a “progressive“, brainwashed by Marxist constructionist ITT mandarins you…

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Meaning v decoding, is it really v?

This makes a lot of sense to me. The search for meaning is the essence of life, and as you have clearly explained this is what every child is created to do. I can remember doing just that when learning to read. Trying to link things in a myroad of ways, and certainly phonics was a very minor part of what was useful to me as a child. In fact, I would go far as to say that phonics, on some level, only made sense AFTER I had already leant to read. It has it’s place, but it was more of a tool in a much much wider tool-kit.

whatdoiknowdotco

walschearts_valve_gear

This blog is about the relationship between decoding and meaning in reading. There will be no attempt to undermine or insult anyone who believes that children should be taught to focus more on one or the other. I have read a lot of research about reading, but I won’t quote it here. I might not quote any Greek philosophers either, sorry. There is research about reading and there is research about learning to read. I’ve read lots of both. I’ve acted on some of it. I write what I write here based on teaching my own children to read before I began teacher training; my training as a class teacher, and my special training as a specialist teacher of reading including the teaching of phonics, systematically. I write what I write also, mainly, because I have sat all day every day for the last 10 years next to struggling readers…

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A fairy tale about the fairy tale…and one tale in particular…Bluebeard.

There once was a man who owned grand estates, in both the country and the city…But this man also had the misfortune of having a blue beard, which made him look so hideously ugly that women and girls alike fled at the sight of him. (Perrault, Contes, 1697). The Initial Situation.  (At home). I’d like …

Continue reading A fairy tale about the fairy tale…and one tale in particular…Bluebeard.